Home » announcements » Panel today, 11am: "The Scorpion and the Frog, How Journalists and Scientists Can Learn To Trust Each Other (though occasionally they shouldn’t)."

Panel today, 11am: "The Scorpion and the Frog, How Journalists and Scientists Can Learn To Trust Each Other (though occasionally they shouldn’t)."

Come see me blather on about how social media can bring the scorpions and frogs together. The main speaker is Matt Richtel, New York Times science journalist.
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Matt Richtel, Pulitzer Price winning journalist from the New York Times, will present a special lecture on Thursday, April 7 at 11:00 a.m. in the Beckman Auditorium. His talk is entitled “The Scorpion and the Frog, How Journalists and Scientists Can Learn To Trust Each Other (though occasionally they shouldn’t).”

Matt’s talk (about 30 minutes) will be followed by a discussion of Science and Journalism with a small panel of colleagues from science and the media (Kathryn Clancy, Diana Yates, Brant Houston, Dan Simons & Scott White).

Abstract for Matt Richtel’s presentation:

More so than ever, journalists and scientists need to be great partners in disseminating discovery and truth. But they need to learn to better understand each other’s needs and methods. Here are some concrete tips for so doing, told through war stories (some personally embarrassing to the speaker, some to the scientists), and as told too through the examples from the Pulitzer Prize winning series “Driven to Distraction” about the risks of multitasking behind the wheel.

Matt Richtel’s Bio:

Matt Richtel is a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and novelist. Since
2000, he has worked in the San Francisco bureau of the New York Times, covering technology and its impact on society. His recent series “Your Brain On Computers,” focuses on how heavy technology use impacts behavior and the brain. His series about distracted driving won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting. His first novel, Hooked, was a critically-acclaimed tech-centric thriller. The sequel, Devil’s Plaything, hits bookstores in May, 2011.


2 Comments

  1. This sounds interesting. Will the talk be recorded or broadcast virtually?

  2. KBHC says:

    The coordinators of the presentation decided not to have it recorded, so everyone could feel they could talk safely and honestly about their experiences with scientists and journalists. But I just put up a post today covering the discussion – hope you find it interesting!

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